Pictured: World Naked Bike Ride comes to London

LONDON (June 11, 2017) — Hundreds stripped off as the World Naked Bike Ride hit London this weekend, aimed at encouraging a ‘vision of a cleaner, safer, body-positive world’.

World Naked Bike Ride participants, June 11, 2017, in London.

World Naked Bike Ride participants, June 11, 2017, in London.

World Naked Bike Ride participants, June 11, 2017, in London.

World Naked Bike Ride participants, June 11, 2017, in London.

World Naked Bike Ride participants, June 11, 2017, in London.

World Naked Bike Ride participants, June 11, 2017, in London.

I can’t imagine Americans ever doing anything like this. I miss England.

A look at world reknown Lock & Co. hats for ladies

Lock & Co. hatters shop front. London.

Lock & Co. hatters shop front. London.

There are few things in life I love more than hats. My dream is to someday have a hat made by Lock & Co. hatters.

Lock & Co. Hatters (formally James Lock and Company Limited) is the world’s oldest hat shop, the world’s 34th oldest family-owned business and holds two Royal warrants. Its shop is located at 6 St James’s Street, London and is a Grade II listed building.

Here are some recent favorite women’s hats created by Lock & Co. hatters.

Click Image to Read New York Times article.

Click Image to Read New York Times article.

 

The above are just a few ladies’ hats. Lock & Co. are also reknown for their men’s hats.

Related Reading

Centuries of Hats“, by Ginanne Brownell Mitic, New York Times, March 29, 2016

Pictured: A great crested Grebe in Blackwall Basin, London

A great crested grebe nurses two young on its back in Blackwall Basin, London. Photograph: Victoria Jones/PA.

A great crested grebe nurses two young on her back in Blackwall Basin, London. Photograph: Victoria Jones/PA.

The RSPB tells us:

A great crested Grebe is a delightfully elegant waterbird with ornate head plumes which led to their being hunted for their feathers, almost leading to their extermination from the UK.

They dive to feed and also to escape, preferring this to flying.

On land they are clumsy because their feet are placed so far back on their bodies. They have an elaborate courtship display in which they rise out of the water and shake their heads.

Very young grebes often ride on their parents’ backs.

Source: The Guardian