Portrait of a racehorse

This is a grand photograph. But the look in this beautiful horse’s eyes makes me feel very wistful.

Advertisements

Pictured: Joel Meyerowitz’s groundbreaking street photography on exhibition in London

LONDON — A new exhibition of Joel Meyerowitz’s groundbreaking street photography traces his fascinating evolution from black and white (‘back there’) to colour (‘obvious’). Of the examples given here is my selection.

New York, 1968 In 1968, a solo exhibition of his photographs was mounted at the Museum of Modern Art, New York, including this one.

New York, 1968
In 1968, a solo exhibition of his photographs was mounted at the Museum of Modern Art, New York, including this one.

Photograph: all photographs © Joel Meyerowitz courtesy Beetles + Huxle.

Joel Meyerowitz spent his early days shooting in black and white on the streets of New York alongside Garry Winogrand and Tony Ray-Jones. Joel Meyerowitz: Towards Colour 1962-1978 is at Beetles+Huxley, London, until 24th June.

Pictured: A great crested Grebe in Blackwall Basin, London

A great crested grebe nurses two young on its back in Blackwall Basin, London. Photograph: Victoria Jones/PA.

A great crested grebe nurses two young on her back in Blackwall Basin, London. Photograph: Victoria Jones/PA.

The RSPB tells us:

A great crested Grebe is a delightfully elegant waterbird with ornate head plumes which led to their being hunted for their feathers, almost leading to their extermination from the UK.

They dive to feed and also to escape, preferring this to flying.

On land they are clumsy because their feet are placed so far back on their bodies. They have an elaborate courtship display in which they rise out of the water and shake their heads.

Very young grebes often ride on their parents’ backs.

Source: The Guardian

Pictured: Pupy the African elephant jailed in a zoolike park in Buenos Aires

Pupy, an African elephant, stands in the doorway of his enclosure at the former city zoo now known as Eco Parque in Buenos Aires, Argentina. Photograph: Natacha Pisarenko / AP.

Pupy, an African elephant, stands in the doorway of his enclosure at the former city zoo now known as Eco Parque in Buenos Aires, Argentina. Photograph: Natacha Pisarenko / AP.

Sad

There is something particularly sad to me about the capture and lifelong imprisonment of wild animals — especially the elephant.

The only ones who seem to suffer more in captivity than the elephant, often to the point of madness, are polar bears. I have observed several who met that fate over the years.

Although a horse racing photographer by trade for more than a decade in the UK and parts of Europe, I was often asked to photograph anything from a favorite pet to wild animals kept in zoos. What I saw in those zoos broke my heart over and over. It got to where I couldn’t accept the assignments.

What a provocative image of this dear soul.

The full description accompanying the image reads:

Pupy, an African elephant, stands in the doorway of his enclosure at the former city zoo now known as Eco Parque in Buenos Aires, Argentina. A year ago the 140-year old Buenos Aires zoo closed its doors and was transformed into a park. The first director decided that the animals should be housed in buildings that reflected their countries of origin. A replica of a Hindu temple was built for the Asian elephants.
Photograph: Natacha Pisarenko/AP.

Source: The Guardian.